Fishing report for Sept. 1

jeff.mayor@thenewstribune.comSeptember 1, 2012 

Anglers can keep both hatchery and wild coho salmon beginning today in ocean waters off Westport (Marine Area 2) and beginning Monday off Ilwaco (Marine Area 1).

In addition, anglers fishing off Westport will be allowed to retain only one coho as part of their two-salmon daily limit beginning today, while the coho catch limit in Ilwaco will remain two fish.

RIVERS

Columbia-Below Bonneville Dam: Last week (excluding Buoy 10), anglers made 16,454 trips and caught 2,662 adult fall chinook (2,647 kept and 15 released), 1,093 summer steelhead (700 kept and 393 released) and 10 coho (kept). Through Sunday, there have been an estimated 43,200 angler trips with 3,600 adult chinook and 4,347 steelhead kept. The preseason catch expectation for the lower river fishery is 25,100 chinook and 1,500 hatchery coho.

Nisqually: Only a handful of salmon are being caught right now, even though there are plenty of fish jumping. People are trying eggs or prawns beneath a bobber or using corkies and yarn.

Puyallup: Coho action seems to have slowed down in recent days. The fish are still on the small side.

Yakima: The upper canyon, Farmlands and lower canyon have been consistent, with reasonable-to-good dry-fly fishing. Small terrestrials worked best in the upper canyon, while medium to large stonefly and hopper patterns have worked best in the Farmlands. The lower canyon has been a mix of both.

LAKES

American: The kokanee bite has been a bit improved, with some fish topping 15 inches. A pink dodger followed by a pink squid has been a good setup.

Black: Fishing for trout and catfish has been good. Most people are using night crawlers or rainbow-colored Power Bait. People trolling are using a Wedding Ring behind a Ford Fender Lake Troll.

Potholes: Trout fishing is the best it has been in 10 years. Trolling a No. 3 Needlefish or diving plugs like a No. 7 Rapala Shad Rap, Baby Hot Lips or D-C 13 are bringing in some big trout. Rainbow trout 4 pounds or heavier are not uncommon.

SALT WATER

Crabbing: Recreational crab fishing will close Monday across most of Puget Sound, including the waters off Olympia and Tacoma. The two areas that will remain open to crab fishing after Labor Day are marine areas 7-North and 7-South near the San Juan Islands. Summer catch reports are due by Oct. 1.

Fly-fishing: Saltwater action has been good to very good. The sea-run cutthroat fishing has been very good, and now migratory coho are moving into the Sound. Pink/white and chartreuse/white Lite Brite Clousers are the top pick right now but Wire Comets also are working well.

Ilwaco: Anglers averaged a little more than one salmon per every other rod last week. The catch was split evenly between chinook and coho. Through Sunday, an estimated 25.6 percent of the coho quota and 63.1 percent of the chinook guideline had been taken.

South Sound: Salmon fishing has been fair with chinook spread throughout the area. People are going deep to find the chinook. More and more coho are starting to show up as well.

Westport: Last week anglers averaged .83 salmon per person, catching slightly more chinook than coho. That was the best week in the last month. Late this week, boats were finding fish off Pacific Beach.

Contributing to this report: Gig Harbor Fly Shop, Mike Meseberg at MarDon Resort, state Department of Fish and Wildlife, Westport Charter Association, The Evening Hatch, Gamefishin.com, Washingtonlakes.com, Tom Pollack at Sportco and Salmon Shores Resort. jeff.mayor@thenewstribune.com 253-597-8640 blog.thenewstribune.com/adventure

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