Big Easy ready to show off Sunday

The Associated PressJanuary 29, 2013 

NEW ORLEANS — A 20-story-high mural of the Lombardi Trophy, affixed to the glass exterior of a bustling hotel that was once a shattered symbol of Hurricane Katrina’s devastation, rises like a beacon above the expansive white roof of the Superdome.

The Super Bowl is back in the Big Easy, finally, after 11 years, giving New Orleans a spotlight of global proportion to showcase how far it has come since Katrina left the city on its knees and under water in August of 2005.

“The story is much, much bigger than the Super Bowl,” Mayor Mitch Landrieu said Monday afternoon. “This is a story about the resurrection and redemption of a great American city.

“The Super Bowl gives us an opportunity to reflect on where we’ve been and where we’re going.”

From 1970 to 2002, New Orleans was a regular host of the Super Bowl and hopes to become one again. When the Baltimore Ravens meet the San Francisco 49ers in the Superdome on Sunday, the Crescent City will host the NFL’s marquee game for the 10th time, tying Miami for the most of any city. If all goes well, it hopes to get back in the rotation.

Jay Cicero, president of the Greater New Orleans Sports Foundation, said his group will ask the NFL for permission to put together a bid for the 2018 Super Bowl, coinciding with the city’s celebration of its 300th anniversary.

It is that history, which produced a colorful culture driven by a mix of European, Caribbean and African influences, that makes New Orleans such an attractive Super Bowl city, noted political consultant James Carville said.

“This is not just a city. This is a culture,” said Carville, who lives in New Orleans and serves as the co-chairman of the Super Bowl host committee with his wife and fellow political pundit, Mary Matalin. “We have our own food, our own music, our own social structure, our own architecture, our own body of literature. By God, we have our own funerals.”

Extensive renovations to the Superdome, done in several phases during six years, ran about $336 million, transforming the stadium to a facility better equipped to host a Super Bowl than it was in 2002.

The Louis Armstrong International Airport has undergone $350 million in upgrades, with work going on right up until this month.

Streets throughout much of the city, including downtown and the French Quarter, have been repaved.

A new streetcar line, which opened Monday morning, can shuttle people from the city’s main train and bus station a few blocks from the Superdome to Canal Street, where downtown meets the French Quarter.

There are more restaurants in the metro area than before Katrina. Hotels throughout downtown have been renovated and some new ones have gone up, adding more than 4,000 more rooms than there were in 2005.

The 1,200-room Hyatt Hotel, with the signature giant Lombardi Trophy mural,, finally reopened a little more than a year ago after a $275 million renovation.

“The city looks great,” said Jerry Romig, the Saints’ 83-year-old public address announcer, a lifelong New Orleans resident who has been involved in the previous nine Super Bowls. “It’s never looked better.”

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