Crews make progress on Capitol Forest fire

Staff writerMay 6, 2013 

A fire that started early Sunday morning in Capitol Forest about eight miles northwest of Littlerock remained at about 60 acres as of Monday morning - the same size as Sunday - and was not expected to spread, according to the State Department of Natural Resources. Photo courtesy of Chuck Turley of Washington Department of Natural Resources

Fire crews expect to have the C-line Fire 50 percent contained by 6 p.m. Monday as it burns on about 60 acres in Capitol Forest, according to the state Department of Natural Resources.

The fire started early Sunday morning about eight miles northwest of Littlerock. Because of higher humidity and lower wind speeds, the fire did not grow in size on Monday, DNR spokeswoman Karen Ripley said.

The fire was six percent contained as of Monday morning, but about 80 firefighters deployed to the fire worked diligently to build containment lines, and DNR helipcopters dumped water on the blaze, Ripley added.

“It’s not expected to spread, as it moves toward green timber in the area,” she said. Ripley added that the fire also would be slowed as it headed toward riparian areas of the forest near a creek.

The fire is mainly burning a logged area on state land trust, where there is combustible debris from a logging operation, she said.

Resources fighting the fire include hand crews, engines and other heavy equipment, as well as the helicopters, Ripley said. Hand crews are working to create containment lines by clearing out combustible debris to stop the fire, she added.

The cause of the fire is under investigation. The C-line and C-4000 Roads were still closed Monday as a public safety precaution, Ripley added.

“There are no structures or homes threatened by the fire,” Ripley said.

DNR crews were also fighting the Dog Mountain Fire in Lewis County Monday. That 170-acre fire is 50 percent contained, she said.

In general, the fire risk in western Washington was much lower Monday than it was over the weekend, when strong, dry easterly winds created combustible conditions for wildland fires, Ripley said.

Jeremy Pawloski: 360-754-5445 jpawloski@theolympian.comEREMY PAWLOSKI Staff writer

Fire crews expect to have the C-line Fire 50 percent contained by 6 p.m. Monday as it burns on about 60 acres in Capitol Forest, according to the state Department of Natural Resources.

The fire started early Sunday morning about eight miles northwest of Littlerock. Because of higher humidity and lower wind speeds, the fire did not grow in size on Monday, DNR spokeswoman Karen Ripley said.

The fire was six percent contained as of Monday morning, but about 80 firefighters deployed to the fire worked diligently to build containment lines, and DNR helipcopters dumped water on the blaze, Ripley added.

“It’s not expected to spread, as it moves toward green timber in the area,” she said. Ripley added that the fire also would be slowed as it headed toward riparian areas of the forest near a creek.

The fire is mainly burning a logged area on state land trust, where there is combustible debris from a logging operation, she said.

Resources fighting the fire include hand crews, engines and other heavy equipment, as well as the helicopters, Ripley said. Hand crews are working to create containment lines by clearing out combustible debris to stop the fire, she added.

The cause of the fire is under investigation. The C-line and C-4000 Roads were still closed Monday as a public safety precaution, Ripley added.

“There are no structures or homes threatened by the fire,” Ripley said.

DNR crews were also fighting the Dog Mountain Fire in Lewis County Monday. That 170-acre fire is 50 percent contained, she said.

In general, the fire risk in western Washington was much lower Monday than it was over the weekend, when strong, dry easterly winds created combustible conditions for wildland fires, Ripley said.

Jeremy Pawloski: 360-754-5445 jpawloski@theolympian.com

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