Sounders' Martins scores twice to double up DC

Forward Obafemi Martins gets a goal in each half to take over the team lead with 6 and continue United’s road woes

don.ruiz@thenewstribune.comJuly 4, 2013 

Seattle — Seattle Sounders FC forward Obafemi Martins outscored D.C. United by two goals on Wednesday, and he’s closing in on catching them for the season.

Martins recorded his team-high fifth and sixth goals, sending the Sounders to a 2-0 win at CenturyLink Field.

D.C. United (2-13-3) has scored eight goals in 18 games this season, including one goal in eight road games.

Seattle (7-5-3) got the only goal it would need in the 19th minute, when Brad Evans took the ball around midfield and slipped a pass forward to Martins, who received it a step behind D.C. right back James Riley, a former Sounders player. Martins took the pass just atop United’s penalty area, and when he got just inside it, he fired a low shot that beat goalkeeper Joe Willis to the near post.

The game opened up considerably in the second half, with both teams getting dangerous chances.

Martins added the clincher in stoppage time, scoring from close range.

The game was played before a crowd of 39,180, the Sounders’ third-largest of the season. However, many missed the start of the match while standing in long lines after the club introduced a metal-detection wanding policy at the stadium gates.

The Sounders will return to training today, preparing for their MLS match Saturday at Vancouver, B.C.

Don Ruiz: 253-597-8808 don.ruiz@thenewstribune.com blog.thenewstribune.com/soccer @donruiztnt

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