Habitat for Humanity moving to west Olympia

New location near Goodwill has more space, visibility

Staff writerAugust 27, 2013 

South Puget Sound Habitat for Humanity is pulling up stakes downtown, moving its recycled building materials store, offices and homeownership program to a site in west Olympia that offers more room, more parking and more visibility to passing traffic.

ROLF BOONE; STAFF WRITER

South Puget Sound Habitat for Humanity is pulling up stakes downtown, moving its recycled building materials store, offices and homeownership program to a site in west Olympia that offers more room, more parking and more visibility to passing traffic.

The new, 23,000-square-foot destination, which is called the South Puget Sound Habitat for Humanity Store and is expected to open Sept. 10, is the former Dollar Store at 400 Cooper Point Road.

The Dollar Store closed in 2010.

The nonprofit has signed a long-term lease for the space and put up its sign at the new location, but continues to move into and renovate the space, Habitat for Humanity executive director Curt Andino said.

“This is really a positive move for us,” he said, adding that not only does the nonprofit gain more space, but it is also near Goodwill, potentially creating a one-stop destination for donating recycled items to both organizations. Andino called Goodwill the perfect neighbor.

“These guys lead the way in nonprofit retail practices,” he said.

South Puget Sound Habitat for Humanity spent about 13 years downtown in two locations, the most recent a 16,000-square-foot warehouse at 415 Olympia Ave.

The organization leased the building from Bryan Kolb.

Kolb, who said Monday that he has owned the building for about 12 years, said Habitat for Humanity’s lease expires at the end of September.

“It is not actively for sale, but it is actively for lease,” Kolb said about his property.

Although the new store is expected to open Sept. 10, the organization’s move won’t be complete until the end of September, Andino said.

The organization also is set to launch two programs at its new digs.

Both are called building material recovery programs, one of which will remove building materials from a home or business when those spaces are about to be remodeled, he said.

“If you’re a remodeler, you show up to a clean and empty space ready to install,” Andino said in an email about the program. It is a free service, although he added that there “could be a fee assigned by the contractor if we were brought in as a sub-contractor.”

The other plan is to set up a mobile site at the Thurston County Waste and Recovery Center, “directly recovering building materials that we can sell,” Andino said.

Revenue generated by its store in Olympia and another in Yelm, which opened a year ago, help to fund Habitat for Humanity’s main mission, which is building homes for qualifying, low-income families.

About 54 cents of every dollar from the stores helps to fund those efforts, regional store manager Caleb White has said.

The group’s next project is its largest. It’s called Wood’s Glen, a 33-unit home development in the area of 37th Avenue and College Street in Lacey. The next largest project was Fairview Cottages, a 15-unit development in northeast Olympia that broke ground in 2006 and was recently completed.

Rolf Boone: 360-754-5403 rboone@theolympian.com

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