The Don't-Miss List for this weekend's Arts Walk

Contributing writerApril 24, 2014 

ART CAR -- A real Wonder: What do you get if you build a stagecoach on the frame of an electric car and add a team of carousel horses in front? It’s the WONDER WAGON, a mighty unusual mode of transportation constructed by Tom Bates and Gretchen Roosevelt of Tacoma for the Burning Man Festival. At Burning Man, cars aren’t allowed, but “mutant vehicles” are more than welcome. Bates and Roosevelt will have the Wonder Wagon on display from 5-9 p.m. Friday at the Hands On Children’s Museum, 414 Jefferson St. NE. Rides will not be offered, but visitors are welcome to sit inside the coach and on one of the carousel horses, and Bates is hoping to send a ball of fire skyward from the wagon. Admission is free, and adult visitors are welcome. Details: 360-956-0818 or hocm.org

PHOTOGRAPHY -- Self-objectification: You never know what visual tricks artist BIL FLEMING will have up his sleeve – kinetic sculptures, dragons made of plastic bags, performance dishwashing. On Friday, though, Fleming won’t have anything up his sleeve — because he’ll be nude in the photographs he’s showing from 4-8 p.m. at Media Island, 816 Adams St. SE. His show “INTERACTIVE NUDE SELF-PORTRAITS” features photos inspired by the way the female body is objectified as well as digital composite photos of nude female bodies. The interactive part means that viewers can choose whether to see full frontal nudity. If the weather allows, Fleming plans to show his plastic-bag creation “The Blow-Up Plastic Kinetic Kracken” outside Media Island.

DANCE -- In the moment: RADCO (Random Acts of Dance Collective) is best known for its creative contemporary dance performances, but the heart of the group’s work is in improv. The dancers practice working on structured improvisations together as part of the process of creating group dances. On Friday, the group will combine the moment of creation with the moment of performance in an all-improv show. There’ll be opportunities for audience participation, too. The dancing will happen at 6 p.m. at Motion in Balance, 219 Legion Way SW.

DANCE -- Get moving: If you’re more interested in moving your body than watching other people move, Arts Walk offers multiple opportunities. On Friday at Wild Grace Arts, 507 Cherry St. SE, you can sample NIA, a fitness class that blends dance and martial arts, at 5 p.m. with Julia Annis; ZUMBA, a Latin dance workout, at 7:15 p.m.; and BALLROOM DANCE at 8:15 p.m. On Saturday at the Eagles Hall, 805 Fourth Ave. E., learn SOCIAL DANCE with Donna Pallo-Perez.

MIXED MEDIA -- Art with depth: Olympia art mavens have been talking about SALON REFU, aka Susan Christian’s PROJECT SPACE, at 114 Capitol Way N. For Arts Walk, Christian is featuring paintings, etchings and photographs by Thomas Johnston of Olympia, former chairman of the art department at Western Washington University. The abstract works “are complicated records of time spent repeatedly adding to and subtracting from layers and layers of color, then sanding and lacquering, sanding and lacquering,” Christian said. The opening reception is from 6-9 p.m. Friday, and the show will be up through May 6. Details: 360-280-3540

MIXED MEDIA -- Caught in the act: Comic artist P. CALAVARA, creator of the “Olympia: It’s the coffee” T-shirt, will be creating a book before Olympia’s very eyes during Arts Walk at The Washington Center for the Performing Arts, 512 Washington St. SE. Calavara (aka Rick Perry of Olympia) and partner in art Christine Malek also will be releasing a novel called “THE ADVENTURE OF THE MYSTERIOUS ADVENTURE” about Harmony Boom Island, showing drawings and soft sculptures of the island’s way-too-cute denizens and possibly also Calavara’s popular Panda Bunny. Details: calavara.com

MIXED MEDIA -- All natural: Feathers will meet felt at the Yoga Loft, 219 Legion Way SW, where felt maker JANICE ARNOLD and CHRIS MAYNARD, whose feather shadowboxes have drawn international attention, are collaborating. Arnold will be showing portions of “Luminarium,” commissioned by the Bellevue Art Museum, and she and Maynard will incorporate feathers into the piece. Also on display will be Maynard’s shadowboxes, Arnold’s wearable art, and process photos from the Bellevue Art Museum installation. Arnold and Maynard will be at the Yoga Loft on Friday to speak about their work and collaboration at 8 p.m. Details: jafelt.com or featherfolio.com

MOSAIC -- Sharing her skills: Mosaic artist JENNIFER KUHNS, the Arts Walk map cover artist in 2007, has been showing at Arts Walk for two decades. This year, her exhibit at Hot Toddy, 410 Capitol Way S., will feature the mosaic egg she was working on during last spring’s Arts Walk, plus the work of students who attend her drop-in art program in Shelton. The program welcomes any teen without a place to be on Fridays after school. Students will be at Hot Toddy on Friday to talk about the program, sell their work and accept donations.

SPOKEN WORD -- ‘Thou cream-faced loon’: Just one mark of Shakespeare’s creativity is his variety of colorful insults. (The above is from “Macbeth.”) Students from Avanti High School are taking a page from the bard’s book for Arts Walk and will provide SHAKESPEAREAN INSULTS — or compliments — to passers-by who request them. The students, most taking Advanced Placement English, will show off their skills from 5-9 p.m. at the corner of Franklin Street and Fourth Avenue and at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Washington Street.

YOGA -- Heavy, man: Yoga meets hard rock at the Bandha Room, where RANDY D'ROADIE will demonstrate HEAVY METAL YOGA at 7 p.m. Friday. What exactly that entails is a bit of a mystery, but the press release promises the real story on “headbanging and the horned hand mudra.” The Bandha Room is at 119 Capitol Way N.

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