Cano gets last laugh versus former team with M’s win

Mariners second baseman withstands boos; scores, drives in a run in first return trip to New York

bob.dutton@thenewstribune.comApril 30, 2014 

NEW YORK — It was a cold, wet miserable Tuesday in the South Bronx but beautiful nonetheless for Robinson Cano in his return to Yankee Stadium.

Corey Hart’s two-run double highlighted a four-run fifth inning that carried the Seattle Mariners to a 6-3 victory over the New York Yankees in the start to a three-game series.

And Cano?

He was booed at every turn by a sparse crowd, announced as 37,484, for his decision in December to trade his pinstripes after nine years with the Yankees for a massive free-agent contract with the Mariners.

“I’m not surprised,” he said. “Like I said, I’m going to get some cheers and boos. I knew I was going to get some boos. That’s not

something I can control.”

The Mariners also beat a longtime nemesis in CC Sabathia, who had beaten them eight straight times and entered the game with a 12-4 record against Seattle in his career.

Sabathia (3-3) gave up four runs and nine hits before departing in the sixth.

“I think we, collectively, had good at-bats,” said Mariners catcher Mike Zunino, who had a career-high four hits. “I think CC threw the ball really well today, but ...we’re patient and (worked) the pitch count.”

Mariners starter Chris Young (1-0) got his first victory since Sept. 2, 2012 by holding the Yankees to two runs and three hits in 52/3 innings before Charlie Furbush, Danny Farquhar and Fernando Rodney closed it out.

“I pitched well enough to win,” said Young, who missed nearly all of last season while recovering from surgery to address thoracic outlet syndrome.

“That’s the goal. The team wins, I’m happy. If you lose 1-0, you’re upset with the pitch you made that didn’t get it done. And tonight, I made enough quality pitches that it gave the team a chance.”

It got interesting in the ninth when the Yankees nicked Rodney for three straight hits with one out, which produced a run and brought the tying run to the plate.

Rodney closed it out by striking out Derek Jeter and Carlos Beltran.

“I’ve always said the toughest three outs in baseball to get are the last three outs at Yankee Stadium,” manager Lloyd McClendon said. “So, no surprise.”

The Mariners trailed 2-0 before breaking through in the fifth after winning a replay challenge. Zunino was initially called out on a leadoff grounder to second, but replays showed he beat the throw for a single.

Willie Bloomquist’s single past first moved Zunino to third before Abraham Almonte reached on a bunt single when second baseman Brian Roberts was slow to cover first.

Sabathia struck out Stefen Romero, which brought Cano to the plate with the bases loaded and one out. Cano grounded out to first, which scored a run.

Hart followed with a two-run double past center fielder Brett Gardner for a 3-2 lead. Justin Smoak then lined an RBI single to right, and it was 4-2.

“I thought (Sabathia) had really good stuff tonight,” Yankees manager Joe Girardi said. “It’s hard to believe he gave up those four runs.”

The Mariners added two more runs in the seventh on two-out RBI singles by Dustin Ackley and Kyle Seager. Seattle finished with a season-high 15 hits, including at least one from nine different players.

“We wanted to go out and play well (for Cano),” Zunino admitted. “Obviously, anytime we can have his back coming into a place where he was such a great player. We knew he wanted to come and play well here.

“I’m happy we could do that for him.”

Cano was 1-for-5 with two strikeouts and three routine infield grounders.

“I’ve gotten used to not seeing him here,” Jeter said. “But seeing him in another uniform, because we don’t play him in the spring, is kind of an odd picture.”

Cano’s first at-bat prompted loud boos — until he struck out. Then cheers ringed the stadium.

When the Mariners took the field, the roll-call battalion in right field serenaded Cano not with his name but with a mix of “You struck out” and “You sold out.”

The usual roll-call response is a wave; Cano did nothing as the chant boomed.

“I didn’t hear that,” he said. “But whatever the fans say, I can’t control that. I don’t want to say they’re wrong or they’re right.”

On this night, at least, Cano had the last laugh.

bob.dutton@thenewstribune.com blog.thenewstribune.com/mariners @TNT_Mariners

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