Raking up nature’s remains, the one downside of fall color, is considered “job security,” says Ryan Banwoth, student supervisor for groundskeeping at the University of Puget Sound. Banworth says keeping up with the mature trees on campus is a never-ending task that he doesn’t mind. “Got to get them up before they clog the municipal drains,” he says.
Raking up nature’s remains, the one downside of fall color, is considered “job security,” says Ryan Banwoth, student supervisor for groundskeeping at the University of Puget Sound. Banworth says keeping up with the mature trees on campus is a never-ending task that he doesn’t mind. “Got to get them up before they clog the municipal drains,” he says. Drew Perine dperine@thenewstribune.com
Raking up nature’s remains, the one downside of fall color, is considered “job security,” says Ryan Banwoth, student supervisor for groundskeeping at the University of Puget Sound. Banworth says keeping up with the mature trees on campus is a never-ending task that he doesn’t mind. “Got to get them up before they clog the municipal drains,” he says. Drew Perine dperine@thenewstribune.com

Pacific Northwest falls really are getting more colorful

October 27, 2016 7:00 AM