Officers Tyler Bahrenburg, left, and Denis Budai, right, used GPS data attached to images allegedly taken by poaching suspects to find kill sites. Then, they used the images themselves to find the specific location, often a tree, where animals were killed. “Nine times out of 10, there was a carcass there,” Budai said.
Officers Tyler Bahrenburg, left, and Denis Budai, right, used GPS data attached to images allegedly taken by poaching suspects to find kill sites. Then, they used the images themselves to find the specific location, often a tree, where animals were killed. “Nine times out of 10, there was a carcass there,” Budai said. Evan Bush Seattle Times
Officers Tyler Bahrenburg, left, and Denis Budai, right, used GPS data attached to images allegedly taken by poaching suspects to find kill sites. Then, they used the images themselves to find the specific location, often a tree, where animals were killed. “Nine times out of 10, there was a carcass there,” Budai said. Evan Bush Seattle Times

Wildlife poachers left behind meat and hides. Did they kill simply for social-media likes?

October 14, 2017 08:00 AM

UPDATED October 16, 2017 03:34 PM

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