U.S. Navy Ensign Megan Stevenson, of Raymond, Maine, steps through an entrance to a replica of a submarine engine room at the Naval Submarine School in Groton, Connecticut, where Stevenson and other U.S. Navy officers participated in a damage control training exercise. The Navy began bringing female officers on board submarines in 2010, followed by enlisted female sailors five years later. Their retention rates are on par with those of men, according to records obtained by The Associated Press.
U.S. Navy Ensign Megan Stevenson, of Raymond, Maine, steps through an entrance to a replica of a submarine engine room at the Naval Submarine School in Groton, Connecticut, where Stevenson and other U.S. Navy officers participated in a damage control training exercise. The Navy began bringing female officers on board submarines in 2010, followed by enlisted female sailors five years later. Their retention rates are on par with those of men, according to records obtained by The Associated Press. Steven Senne AP file photo
U.S. Navy Ensign Megan Stevenson, of Raymond, Maine, steps through an entrance to a replica of a submarine engine room at the Naval Submarine School in Groton, Connecticut, where Stevenson and other U.S. Navy officers participated in a damage control training exercise. The Navy began bringing female officers on board submarines in 2010, followed by enlisted female sailors five years later. Their retention rates are on par with those of men, according to records obtained by The Associated Press. Steven Senne AP file photo

Women are sticking with US submarines at same rate as men

March 09, 2018 04:31 PM