In this undated photo provided by the University of Washington, Southern resident killer whales swim off the coast of San Juan Island, Wash. Already a small population of 76 animals, the southern residents are acting more like a population of only 20 or 30, with few animals breeding, said Michael Ford, a conservation biologist at NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center.
In this undated photo provided by the University of Washington, Southern resident killer whales swim off the coast of San Juan Island, Wash. Already a small population of 76 animals, the southern residents are acting more like a population of only 20 or 30, with few animals breeding, said Michael Ford, a conservation biologist at NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center. Jane Cogan Associated Press file
In this undated photo provided by the University of Washington, Southern resident killer whales swim off the coast of San Juan Island, Wash. Already a small population of 76 animals, the southern residents are acting more like a population of only 20 or 30, with few animals breeding, said Michael Ford, a conservation biologist at NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center. Jane Cogan Associated Press file

‘Two guys are doing all of the work’: Orcas’ inbreeding may devastate the population

April 19, 2018 02:49 PM