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  • WATCH: Medicinal pot clerk agonizes over shuttering of store

    KP Healing Center on State Route 302 on the Key Peninsula is closing on June 30, 2016, as Washington State aligns the unregulated medical market with the regulated licensed market. Store clerk Chad Oliveira talks about what he thinks this means to his customers. “It’s kind of weird,” he said.

KP Healing Center on State Route 302 on the Key Peninsula is closing on June 30, 2016, as Washington State aligns the unregulated medical market with the regulated licensed market. Store clerk Chad Oliveira talks about what he thinks this means to his customers. “It’s kind of weird,” he said. David Montesino dmontesino@thenewstribune.com
KP Healing Center on State Route 302 on the Key Peninsula is closing on June 30, 2016, as Washington State aligns the unregulated medical market with the regulated licensed market. Store clerk Chad Oliveira talks about what he thinks this means to his customers. “It’s kind of weird,” he said. David Montesino dmontesino@thenewstribune.com

What’s next for medical marijuana?

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