Julie Henning, right, division manager of the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife ecosystem services division habitat program, and Melissa Erkel, left, a fish passage biologist, look at a wide passageway for the north fork of Newaukum Creek near Enumclaw. Federal appeals judges say the state of Washington has violated the treaty rights of tribes to fish by building and maintaining large pipes that allow streams to pass beneath roads but also block migrating salmon.
Julie Henning, right, division manager of the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife ecosystem services division habitat program, and Melissa Erkel, left, a fish passage biologist, look at a wide passageway for the north fork of Newaukum Creek near Enumclaw. Federal appeals judges say the state of Washington has violated the treaty rights of tribes to fish by building and maintaining large pipes that allow streams to pass beneath roads but also block migrating salmon. Ted S. Warren AP file, 2015
Julie Henning, right, division manager of the Washington Dept. of Fish and Wildlife ecosystem services division habitat program, and Melissa Erkel, left, a fish passage biologist, look at a wide passageway for the north fork of Newaukum Creek near Enumclaw. Federal appeals judges say the state of Washington has violated the treaty rights of tribes to fish by building and maintaining large pipes that allow streams to pass beneath roads but also block migrating salmon. Ted S. Warren AP file, 2015

Politics & Government

Appeals court: Washington must fix salmon-blocking culverts

June 27, 2016 7:52 PM

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