Business

Sprucing up at Panorama

Demolition contractor Brian Cross returns to his project of tearing down the old nursing facility at Panorama in Lacey on Friday, April 2, 2010. The $23-million construction project is in its second phase, tearing down and building a new skilled nursing facility, after completion of the new housing units earlier this year.
Demolition contractor Brian Cross returns to his project of tearing down the old nursing facility at Panorama in Lacey on Friday, April 2, 2010. The $23-million construction project is in its second phase, tearing down and building a new skilled nursing facility, after completion of the new housing units earlier this year. The Olympian

LACEY - Demolition work at the sprawling retirement community known as Panorama will continue through next week as the nonprofit clears the way to build the final portion of a 93,000-square-foot addition to its campus.

The addition is the new Convalescent and Rehabilitation Center at Panorama, a $22.5 million project funded by revenue bonds that the organization embarked on about 18 months ago, president Joseph Di Santo said Friday.

The building is complete except for about 24,000 square feet that will house administrative offices and a 3,000-square-foot gymnasium for physical therapy, he said. The two-story rehab center already is home to 155 patient beds, two dining rooms and an area for Alzheimer’s patients.

Being demolished is Panorama’s old convalescent center, a building that opened in 1964. Di Santo said it served the nonprofit well but that it was time for a change.

Panorama residents also praised the new facility.

Carol Lambert, 66, who has lived at Panorama for four years, said her husband, Jim, 63, moved into the convalescent center in February. It has more space, and the residents there look happier, she said.

“The old one was good, but it was old,” Lambert said about the previous center.

The convalescent center is one of many new buildings on Panorama’s 140-acre campus. Also new are an aquatic and fitness center, a 200-seat auditorium, 10 new duplexes and a maintenance building, Di Santo said. He said the organization will take a year off after the center is finished, then start again by renovating the facades on its residences. Panorama also spends $5 million to $6 million annually on fixing up its properties, he said.

Rolf Boone: 360-754-5403

rboone@theolympian.com

www.theolympian.com/bizblog

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