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Mourners stand vigil where 2 died

Friends and family gather Monday to mourn at the Midland intersection where Steven Kenward and Jonathan Capps were killed Sunday evening while riding on a small motorcycle. They were struck by a pickup truck.
Friends and family gather Monday to mourn at the Midland intersection where Steven Kenward and Jonathan Capps were killed Sunday evening while riding on a small motorcycle. They were struck by a pickup truck. The Olympian

Family and friends of Steven Kenward II gathered Monday at the intersection where he died Sunday to support each other, light candles and write messages on a poster taped to a telephone pole.

“What hurts the most is my son lying here dying alone,” said his mother, Gaylene Kenward of Parkland.

Steven Kenward, 22, was riding with a friend, Jonathan Capps, 16, on Capps’ dirt bike when the bike and a pickup truck collided about 9 p.m. at 97th Street East and Golden Given in Midland.

The motorcycle, northbound on Golden Given, was traveling at high speed, wasn’t “street-legal” and had no headlight, Pierce County sheriff’s spokesman Ed Troyer said. The pickup was southbound on Golden Given and turning left onto 97th Street East when the crash occurred.

Kenward and Capps, who were not wearing helmets, were killed. The pickup driver fled and might face a hit-and-run charge, Troyer said. Had the driver not left, he or she might not have faced any charges, he said.

Kenward, the oldest of seven children, was on his way with Capps to his uncle’s house about 300 yards from where the accident happened, his mother said.

Kenward’s brother Scott said he was waiting for the two at the uncle’s house, which has acreage out back on which dirt bikes run. He said a friend called to say there was a motorcycle accident down the street.

Fearing the worst, Scott Ken-ward ran barefoot down Golden Given to the crash. He saw his brother lying there and held him.

“He had a pulse and it sounded like he was trying to say something but he couldn’t say it,” Scott Ken-ward said.

Jonathan was lying about 20 yards away.

“He was so close to home,” Scott Kenward said of his brother. He called family and friends, and many spent much of the night at the intersection. They returned Monday morning.

Gaylene Kenward said her son had learning disabilities, lived with attention deficit disorder and was bipolar.

Dad Steven Kenward said his son couldn’t read or write very well but was very mechanical. He loved “to get into it” when an engine needed work and didn’t mind getting dirty.

“He never quit,” he said of his son.

Family and friends said Kenward and Capps left Capps’ home walking the motorcycle and were supposed to walk it over to his uncle’s house.

Sitting by the telephone pole, Steven Kenward’s sister Ashley, 18, looked up at his picture.

“He was crazy and had an annoying laugh,” she said.

“I’ll miss his laugh,” a friend added.

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