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Thousands find treasures at sale

Michael Boone, left, and Matthew Snead, both of Centralia, carry a wooden table from the Big Community Garage Sale at the Southwest Washington Fairgrounds in Chehalis. Snead said he purchased the table for his wife. "I'm going to be a hero tonight," he said. "She's been waiting for one."
Michael Boone, left, and Matthew Snead, both of Centralia, carry a wooden table from the Big Community Garage Sale at the Southwest Washington Fairgrounds in Chehalis. Snead said he purchased the table for his wife. "I'm going to be a hero tonight," he said. "She's been waiting for one." The Olympian

CHEHALIS - More than 290 vendors and about 4,000 people attended a community garage sale Saturday, a twice-annual event at the Southwest Washington Fairgrounds in Lewis County.

People lined up to get in before the gates opened at 8 a.m., and the stream of visitors was steady all day, said Gale Sobolesky, fairgrounds and events manager. The fairgrounds are home to the Big Community Garage Sale in October and April, she said.

Vendors filled nearly every building on the grounds, selling books, DVDs, clothes, tools, glassware and handmade items. Cathy Garry of Centralia returned this year to sell stuff as part of an estate sale after her mother, Dorothy Scott, died this year. Her mother celebrated her 90th birthday in January, then passed away in June. Left behind were tons of glassware and teddy bears, Garry said.

“This is only part of it,” she said, adding that the family found boxes of stuff stacked high in her mother’s house. “We’ll be back in April.”

Leaving the fairgrounds Saturday with a bag of goodies was Tammy McCain of Centralia.

In one hand was a metal can used by a Seattle-area dairy farm to hold cream, while in her other hand she held a bag with an old stove-top iron in it.

“It’s just fun to visit with people from different places,” she said. Both items she purchased will be used to decorate her home, McCain said. The cream can be filled with flowers and put on display, and her collection of irons will sit atop an old, wooden Coca-Cola crate, she said. The stove-top irons were exactly that: An iron that was heated on the stove before it was used to iron clothes.

Rolf Boone: 360-754-5403 rboone@theolympian.com www.theolympian.com/bizblog

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