Politics & Government

Chronic pain prescriptions led to death of patient, state rules

The Washington State Department of Health sends out news releases on a regular basis about disciplinary actions against health care providers in the state.
The Washington State Department of Health sends out news releases on a regular basis about disciplinary actions against health care providers in the state. Washington State Department of Health

A Lewis County physician will pay a $3,000 fine, produce written pain-management protocols and undergo state reviews as part of an agreement with the state Medical Commission.

According to a news release from the state Department of Health, Charles L. McGill caused a patient’s death by mismanaging the patient’s chronic pain with large dosages and quantities of controlled substances.

“McGill didn’t respond appropriately to signs indicating opioid therapy was producing negative effects,” the news release stated. “He also didn’t appropriately consult with or refer the patient to pain management specialists, or for chemical dependency treatment when the patient’s issues went beyond his ability to manage. McGill didn’t review, renew or update a pain contract for the patient even after signs of abuse or diversion developed.”

In a separate action, the state Secretary of Health denied a registered nursing assistant credential to Sara Jessey Pagano of Thurston County for providing false information on an application.

Pagano checked “no” on a box that asked if she had ever had a health care profession credential revoked or denied.

However, Pagano was issued a credential to practice as a registered counselor under the name Richard W. Bono, which was Pagano’s official name with Department of Health records at the time. That credential was revoked in November 2006, after the state determined the former counselor had crossed professional boundaries with a client, according to Department of Health records.

Lisa Pemberton: 360-754-5433, @Lisa_Pemberton

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