Letters to the Editor

Letters to the Editor for July 11

Now is the time for health care reform

Don’t read this unless you are concerned about your future health care.

Every developed country and many, many poorer ones all enjoy national health care. But anti-reformers tell us that the wealthiest country on the planet can’t afford it.

I guess we don’t need to change because we have superior health care available to all.

Or is this just another big lie to protect the upper incomes of those in the health care industry?

This is the best time to choose health care for ALL. We have nothing to lose from national health care, except our untreated illnesses. Staying the current course means choosing the self-destructive path of the dodo bird.

Don’t let big medicine profit from your aches and pain. Call your representative and strongly advocate for the wellness of you and your family.

MARTIN KIMELDORF

Tumwater

Budget bureaucrats wreak havoc

As a nurse working with Medi-caid, I am appalled at the decision made by DSHS to meet budget shortfalls. Cuts to our social safety net were harsh. I’m referring to the extremely short-sighted cuts for coverage of certain medical equipment.

We read about the alarming increase in diabetes, yet they chose to cut reimbursement for diabetic testing strips. Type 2 diabetics will be limited to 100 strips every three months, limiting testing to once daily. The usual recommendation from a physician is testing before meals and at bedtime. There is no way most diabetics, especially a new diabetic, can regulate their blood sugars with once daily testing.

The true cost of treating someone with uncontrolled blood sugars is staggering — ER visits, surgeries, amputations, cardiovascular complications and dialysis.

Another amazing decision is to limit the number of gloves a patient can use monthly. We are facing rampant MRSA outbreaks in the community, sounding the alarm about E. coli, swine flu and avian flu pandemics, but we are limiting the use of gloves to three pairs a day for sick patients cared for at home. Perhaps one of the wise legislators would like to tackle cleaning a patient or family member having constant diarrhea from highly contagious C. difficile (widespread in the community these days) with a limit of three pairs of gloves a day.

There are many more issues. These are a few examples of short sighted, ill-advised decisions by bureaucrats far removed from the reality of the consequences of their decisions.

LYNN WEINACHT

Tumwater

Single-payer health system is the answer

Do we need a single-payer health plan?

Yes.

In answer to all those writing demagogic letters on this subject I wonder how many realize that 60 percent of our health care is currently single payer. I am referring to Medicare, Medicaid, and the Veterans Administration health care systems.

Many letter writers couch their negative attitudes on this subject by calling it socialism and/or fascism. Neither argument makes any sense.

Socialism has two meanings: authoritative government or democratic government.

Fascism is an authoritative government from the right. The latter cannot refer to our current government, though it did to the last administration.

Only an election saved the Constitution. There is a lot of anecdotal chatter regarding the ills of single-payer health, but you won’t find it among those over 65 who are on Medicare.

MARTHA PIERCE

Lacey

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