Sports

US Open countdown: Boros keeps giant-killer status with 1963 title

63rd U.S. Open | June 20-23, 1963

The Country Club, Brookline, Mass.

Leaderboard

x-Julius Boros, United States 71 - 74 - 76 - 72 293
Jacky Cupit, United States 70 - 72 - 76 - 75 293
Arnold Palmer, United States 73 - 69 - 77 - 74 293
Paul Harney, United States 78 - 70 - 73 - 73 294
Bruce Crampton, Australia 74 - 72 - 75 - 74 295
Tony Lema, United States 71 - 74 - 74 - 76 295
Billy Maxwell, United States 73 - 73 - 75 - 74 295
x-won playoff.

After an earlier U.S. Open triumph over Ben Hogan, ending his two-year reign as champion, Boros truly established himself as a bit of a giant killer, taking down Palmer in a playoff for his second national open title.

Relaxed and stoic, and never seemingly scared of the moment, especially under difficult scoring conditions, Boros fired a 1-under 70 in the playoff. Two birdies at the fourth and fifth hole got him out fast, and he never looked back.

In fact, the man his colleagues called “The Big Moose” one-putted 11 of the first 14 holes — and totaled 25 putts. His wedge play was also superb.

Cupit was second with a 73, and Palmer — who woke up hours before the playoff with a stomach bug, and sweated profusely throughout the day — had a 76.

It was a trying week for the field as the national open returned to The Country Club on the 50-year anniversary of Francis Ouimet’s magical victory in 1913.

Winds kicked up to nearly 50 mph on the final day of regulation. The 293 winning total shared by Boros, Cupit and Palmer was the highest in the post-World War II era.

Boros’ 11-year gap between U.S. Open wins became the longest all time, eclipsing the 10-year wait Gene Sarazen had (1922, 1932). Hale Irwin matched Boros’ feat with his final two wins (1979, 1990).

At the time, Boros (43 years old) also became the second-oldest U.S. Open winner behind Ted Ray in 1920.

This U.S. Open was notable in the fact it was the first time no amateur made the cut.

todd.milles@thenewstribune.com

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