Seahawks Insider Blog

Carroll talks to team about Trump’s election; WR Doug Baldwin terms result “disheartening”

Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin, a native of Florida, says of America voting Donald Trump as president: "In terms of growing up in the South and being around a more conservative area, it resonated with me pretty painfully that that’s what our population wanted, that’s what the country wanted. And to move in that direction is disheartening to some degree."
Seahawks wide receiver Doug Baldwin, a native of Florida, says of America voting Donald Trump as president: "In terms of growing up in the South and being around a more conservative area, it resonated with me pretty painfully that that’s what our population wanted, that’s what the country wanted. And to move in that direction is disheartening to some degree." jbessex@gateline.com

RENTON Pete Carroll met with his Seahawks Wednesday to discuss their many emotions over Donald Trump winning the presidential election the night before.

But the coach did not have to quell.

"No, there wasn’t an uprising," Carroll said.

Yet two hours after Carroll met with the players about it, Doug Baldwin was still shaking his head over what our democracy said when it spoke Tuesday.

The Seahawks top wide receiver-turned-2016 social mover is afraid Trump may bring into office with him a new, destructive momentum to Baldwin’s efforts to get states to reform their police policies and trainings in the wake of killing of minorities across America.

"Um, it was rough," Baldwin said of watching Tuesday night’s returns. "I held out hope for a long time, but unfortunately it didn’t go the way that I thought it was going to go."

He chose to register in his native Florida to vote absentee there in this election instead of Washington, because he felt his state would be vital to determining the winner. It was. Florida largely decided the close election when its 29 electoral votes went to Trump.

“I don’t know if I can put it in degrees,” Baldwin said of his disappointment.

“I thought that a lot of the things that we have seen in the past few months kind of brought up a lot of old emotions and old feelings.

“In terms of growing up in the South and being around a more conservative area, it resonated with me pretty painfully that that’s what our population wanted, that’s what the country wanted. And to move in that direction is disheartening to some degree.”

Baldwin said his biggest problem with the nation electing Trump is "we’ve allowed our fears and our doubts and our questions about things that we don’t know to become more divisive than uniting us as a country, as a people. And in doing so we’ve taken facts and knowledge and information and the importance of that, and we’ve replaced it with just our beliefs — in the beliefs of what we should fear or the beliefs of what our problems are. And those seem to resonate more with the voices or the ears and eyes of people in our culture, in our country, more so than facts."

Baldwin has met with Seattle police and Washington law-enforcement officials this summer and fall in sessions he’s called informative and eye-opening. He says Trump’s fiery rhetoric during the campaign that often angered minorities had made his task of getting states to reform police polices more difficult.

"Now it’s become more divisive, and so it’s discouraging at some point," he said. "But the fight must continue."

Baldwin said the political landscape in Washington helps his cause, though.

"I think for the most part Washington state has been progressive in that regard in terms of changing the culture within the police dynamic and within police reform as well, and training," he said. "I don’t think it’s going to change that drastically.

"But I do expect more push back for the changes that we are seeking to make happen.

"I was watching some special the other night about this conversation about why Trump had so many supporters. And one guy said that when he talked to some insiders he said ‘You know, we’ve got a lot of leaners.’ He asked ‘What do you mean by leaners?’ And he said people who will lean in and say ‘You know, I don’t want to let anybody know but I think I am going to vote for Trump.’

"And not to say there is anything wrong with that --- you have your opinion, you have your beliefs, I’m OK with that. But I think now it’s more in the open that those beliefs, those opinions, are more broad than what we thought they were."

Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman, Baldwin’s fellow Stanford graduate and college teammate, also had an opinion on Trump getting elected. Of course he did.

Asked if he was disappointed like Baldwin was in the outcome, Sherman said: “No.

“I’ve been disappointed a long time ago.”

GRAHAM RESTS, RAWLS SORT OF RETURNS

Tight end Jimmy Graham took a day off from practice after his two-touchdown first half Monday night against Buffalo.

Thomas Rawls returned to practice on a limited basis for the first time since he cracked his fibula Sept. 18 at Los Angeles. But coach Pete Carroll said Rawls won’t play until Nov. 20 against Philadelphia at the earliest.

Tight end Luke Willson practiced on a limited basis for the first time since his knee surgery last month.

Left tackle Bradley Sowell returned to practice fully for the first time since he sprained his right knee Oct. 23 at Arizona. Line coach Tom Cable and Carroll both said once Sowell gets back on the field he will compete with undrafted rookie George Fant for the starting job. Fant has started the last two games and gotten praise from Cable and Carroll.

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