Entertainment

Fun events and things to do this week in Thurston County

Warren Miller’s “Timeless” will be screened at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7, at the Washington Center for the Performing Arts.
Warren Miller’s “Timeless” will be screened at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 7, at the Washington Center for the Performing Arts. Courtesy photo

Nov. 1-10

Encounter a ‘New World’

Broadway Olympia is beginning its second season with “Songs for a New World,” a show about the moments in life when everything changes. It’s a fitting choice for the company, which finds itself at a turning point. Last season, it staged “Rocky Horror” and “The Wedding Singer” at the Capitol Theater. This year, the company has no consistent home and plans a season of small-scale passion projects in different locations. The first is Jason Robert Brown’s “World,” a series of songs about pivotal moments in different people’s lives; the show’s four actor-singers play different characters in each song. See the show at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday plus Nov. 7-10 and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday plus Nov. 9 and 10 at the State Theater, 202 Fourth Ave. E., Olympia. Tickets are $29, with a half-price deal for students for the Nov. 7 performance. Get tickets and information at broadwayolympia.com.

_MG_0412.JPG
Broadway Olympia is beginning its second season with “Songs for a New World,” which will play weekends through Nov. 10 at the State Theater. Kyle Murphy Courtesy of Broadway Olympia


Nov. 1

Museum goes batty over critters that start with B

The Hands On Children’s Museum will celebrate the birds and the bugs (you thought it was going to be “bees,” didn’t you?) and the bats at its First Friday Night event. Kids and families are invited to learn about exoskeletons and endoskeletons and compare the structures of the aforementioned animals and others and to explore the museum from 5 to 9 p.m. Admission is free for the first two people in a family or group and $2 for each additional person. Learn more at hocm.org, or call 360-956-0818.

Nov. 1

Still touring after all these years

Beloved singer/songwriter Jonathan Richman — whose “Roadrunner” has been called the first punk song — stops in Olympia Friday for a concert with drummer Tommy Larkin. Richman, known for his guileless honesty and playfulness, has been wowing critics since at least 1972, when New York Daily News columnist Lilian Roxon described the work of his band Modern Lovers as a combination of the Velvet Underground, the Kinks and Buddy Holly. The counterculture icon, whose “Ishkode! Ishkode!” was named the No. 2 indie album of 2016 by PopMatters, plays at 8 p.m. at the Capitol Theater, 206 Fifth Ave. SE, Olympia. Tickets are $15-$20. Get the scoop at olympiafilmsociety.org, or call 360-754-6670.

Richman.jpg
Counterculture icon Jonathan Richman will play at 8 p.m. Friday, Nov. 1, at the Capitol Theater in Olympia. Courtesy photo

Nov. 2

He captures animals … on film

Photographer Ronan Donovan has spent much of his career documenting the lives and relationships of social animals. Actually, since humans are social animals, it’s more accurate to say he documents the lives and relationships of other social animals. Think wolves, bears and chimpanzees. Donovan will show his images and talk about the plight of the creatures he’s come to know on Saturday. The talk, part of the National Geographic Live series, begins at 2 p.m. at The Washington Center for the Performing Arts, 512 Washington St. SE, Olympia. Tickets are $25-$40. Get tickets and details at 360-753-8586 or washingtoncenter.org.

Ronan Donovan_3_CR Ronan Donovan.jpg
Photographer Ronan Donovan will talk about his work photographing social animals as part of the National Geographic Live series at 2 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 2, at the Washington Center for the Performing Arts in Olympia. Courtesy photo

Nov. 3

20 years of student music...

On Sunday, Student Orchestras of Greater Olympia — also known as SOGO — launches its 20th season of nurturing young musicians. The orchestras’ fall concert will include such classics as Mussorgsky’s “Night on Bald Mountain,” set on the eve of a witches’ sabbath, and Johannes Brahms’ popular “Hungarian Dance No. 5.” There’ll also be lots of cake. The party begins at 4 p.m. at The Washington Center for the Performing Arts, 512 Washington St. SE, Olympia. Tickets are $7-$21, with children 6 and younger admitted free. Find out more at washingtoncenter.org or studentorchestras.org, or call 360-753-8586.

... and 30 years of music

There’s a second musical celebration set for Sunday — the Olympia Chamber Orchestra’s “Celebrate.” The orchestra begins its 30th season with a program including such appropriate works as Jennifer Higdon’s “Celebration Fanfare” and George Frideric Handel’s flamboyant “Music for the Royal Fireworks.” Also on the program are Camille Saint-Saëns’ “Havanaise for Violin and Orchestra,” featuring guest soloist Steven Lovinger, and Ludwig van Beethoven’s grand, dramatic Symphony No. 3 “Eroica.” The music begins at 2:30 p.m. at St. John’s Episcopal Church, 114 20th Ave. SE, Olympia. Tickets are $10-$20. Get details and tickets at olympiachamberorchestra.org

Nov. 7

Thrills and spills

Both daredevil skiers and those who prefer to stay safe and warm can revel in the sport’s mix of high-speed action and gorgeous snow-covered landscapes Thursday at the Olympia screening of Warren Miller’s “Timeless.” Virtually visit the mountains from Colorado to Switzerland at 7:30 p.m. at The Washington Center for the Performing Arts, 512 Washington St. SE, Olympia. Tickets are $21-$22. Find out more at washingtoncenter.org or 360-753-8586.

Freelance writer Molly Gilmore prefers to stay safe and warm whenever possible. Hear more from her about what’s happening around the Sound every Friday on 95.3 KGY’s “Oly in a Can.”
  Comments