Penelope Muse Abernathy, a University of North Carolina professor, stands with the daily newspaper selection in the Park Library at the School of Journalism in Chapel Hill, N.C. "Strong newspapers have been good for democracy, and both educators and informers of a citizenry and its governing officials. They have been problem-solvers," said Abernathy, who studies news industry trends and oversaw the "news desert" report released the previous fall.
Penelope Muse Abernathy, a University of North Carolina professor, stands with the daily newspaper selection in the Park Library at the School of Journalism in Chapel Hill, N.C. "Strong newspapers have been good for democracy, and both educators and informers of a citizenry and its governing officials. They have been problem-solvers," said Abernathy, who studies news industry trends and oversaw the "news desert" report released the previous fall. Gerry Broome AP
Penelope Muse Abernathy, a University of North Carolina professor, stands with the daily newspaper selection in the Park Library at the School of Journalism in Chapel Hill, N.C. "Strong newspapers have been good for democracy, and both educators and informers of a citizenry and its governing officials. They have been problem-solvers," said Abernathy, who studies news industry trends and oversaw the "news desert" report released the previous fall. Gerry Broome AP