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New computer science learning goals adopted for state

Governor Inslee Comes to Tumwater High

Washington Governor Jay Inslee announces adoption of the state's first computer science standards with a visit to Tumwater High School and its STEM robotics, 3D design and coding classes.
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Washington Governor Jay Inslee announces adoption of the state's first computer science standards with a visit to Tumwater High School and its STEM robotics, 3D design and coding classes.

Washington state schools got their first set of computer science standards on Thursday.

The adoption of the standards took place at Tumwater High School, with Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn, Gov. Jay Inslee and State Superintendent-elect Chris Reykdal in attendance.

“It’s crucial that today’s and tomorrow’s students are not only consumers of computer science, but also makers,” Dorn said in a prepared statement.

“What that means is that they will not only be able to use the latest and greatest mobile app, they will be able to create the latest and greatest mobile app.”

The learning standards build from grade to grade, which means that fourth-grade standards can’t be mastered until after third-grade standards are mastered.

The standards build on the expectation that students understand the difference between a tablet and desktop computer by second grade, that they understand how different file formats represent trade-offs on quality and file size by the eighth grade and understand the issues that affect the speed of computer networks by the time they graduate.

The standards adoption is part of an implementation process lasting four to five years.

During the next six to nine months, OSPI will work with partners to identify short- and long-term needs of districts and to bring together best practices in integrating computer science into the classroom.

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