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What’s Happening for Sept. 20

Friday

Youth Climate Strike: At 11 a.m., Olympia students will strike from school and rally at the state Capitol to protest political inaction on climate change and to demand that government and big businesses stop practices that harm the environment. There will be student speakers and musicians, and a place to write letters to government officials. The event is one of many across the nation and worldwide. Information: https://www.youthclimatestrikeus.org/ or email wash@youthclimatestrikeus.org.

Friday and Saturday

Meditation practice: Insight Dialogue is an interpersonal meditation practice that brings the mindfulness and tranquility of traditional silent meditation into experience with others. The session runs from 7-9 p.m. Friday and 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday at the Olympia Friends Meetinghouse, 3201 Boston Harbor Road NE, Olympia. Chairs provided or bring your own cushion; bring a lunch on Saturday. Previous meditation experience is helpful, not required. Cost is a freewill donation to support the teachers. Information: metta.org

Friday through Sunday

Women of the Woods: This women-led rewilding retreat will be at Camp Singing Wind in Toledo. Headliners are Lyla June, a public speaker, poet, hip-hop artist and acoustic singer-songwriter of Navajo and Cheyenne lineages, and Bibi McGill, a DJ, producer, musician, and yoga instructor from Portland. Sessions will be held on art, healing, sustainability, and connection with nature. A land blessing will be performed by the Cowlitz Tribe and an equinox celebration will be held Saturday evening. Music, yoga, and hiking with goats will also be a part of the retreat. Tickets are available on a sliding scale. Information: www.gathergreenevents.com.

Saturday

Elks’ Oktoberfest: The second annual event from 5-10 p.m. is hosted by the Olympia Elks Lodge #186 at 1818 E. Fourth Ave, Olympia. Hamhocks, schnitzel, rouladen, and brats with the traditional fixings will be served along with live music, a balloon artist, traditional dancers and more. Wear your best traditional Oktoberfest outfit. Family friendly. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. Tickets on sale at http://www.elkslodgetix.com to benefit the lodge.

Chehalis Flying Saucer Party: The Lewis County Historical Museum, 599 NW Front St, Chehalis, launches a brand new festival celebrating Kenneth Arnold’s historic UFO sighting in 1947. The event includes special museum exhibits, talks by distinguished UFO researchers, flying saucer-themed arts, musical acts, food, and old-school science fiction movies at the Chehalis Theater. Arnold’s granddaughter, Shanelle Schanz, will speak and show never-before-seen documents belonging to her grandfather. Admission is $55 for VIP event passes with access to all six speakers and the speaker panel, all movies at the Chehalis Theater, and the Lewis County Historical Museum exhibits, plus a $10 food/drink ticket, an event T shirt, and goodie bag. Prices for individual lectures are $10. Tickets can be purchased at https://chehalisflyingsaucerparty.brownpapertickets.com/ Information: www.flyingsaucerparty.org. Proceeds benefit the museum.

Meet an Arabian Horse: Arabian Horse Association Members will share their love of the Arabian horse and promote riding programs, horse ownership and other activities from 1-3 p.m. at N Joy Arabians, 10401 Evergreen Valley Road SE, Olympia. Free and open to all. Information: http://www.arabianhorses.org/horseday or https://www.facebook.com/events/434570637150075/

Lake Sylvia State Park Fall Festival: The 10th annual festival will take place from 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the state park, 1812 N. Lake Sylvia Road, Montesano. It begins with a pancake breakfast, followed by trail races, live music, an artists market, food vendors, historic talk, kayak paddle, vintage games and arts and crafts. A free shuttle will run from Simpson Elementary School, 519 Simpson Ave W, Montesano. Those who park at the park must have a Discover Pass. Information: fosls.org/ or on Facebook.

Olympia Women’s Suffrage Trail Walking Tours: The Olympia Historical Society & Bigelow House Museum are presenting walking tours along “Olympia’s Women’s Suffrage Trail” beginning at Sylvester Park in downtown Olympia (Capitol Way between Legion and Seventh) starting at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. Each tour will last about an hour and requires considerable walking. Attendees will receive a map at the beginning of the tour. An interactive map and other information is available at olympiahistory.org and www.suffrage100wa.com.

Thurston County Republican Party Annual Picnic: The picnic is planned for 3-6 p.m. at Woodland Creek Park near Lacey Community Center, 6729 Pacific Ave SE. Enjoy last days of summer, make new friends, and learn more about the party and what it stands for. Hotdogs, hamburgers and drinks provided; bring a side dish to share. Children welcome and playground nearby.

Hypatia-in-the-Woods equinox fundraiser: Enjoy music, munchies, and a silent auction from 3-5 p.m. at Walter Dacon Winery, 50 SE Skookum Inlet Road, Shelton. Music will be provided by Dulcimer Friends. Advance tickets are required since admission is limited. They can be reserved by contacting Aileen Miller at 360-701-7699 or mirzarene@comcast.net. Tickets are $20 and include light refreshments and three wine samples. Hypatia-in-the-Woods, a Mason County nonprofit, offers residencies to women in the arts, academia and entrepreneurship.

Autumn Homesteading Faire: Rocking Chair Ranch in Rochester will host an “Autumn Homesteading Faire,” presented by The Rochester Homesteading & Self Sufficiency Group, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 11020 Independence Road in Rochester. The event will include demonstrations, education, food, vendors, cider pressing and more. Information: https://www.facebook.com/events/516837888858571/.

Madison Scenic Park Volunteer Work Party: From 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. volunteers will remove English ivy, Himalayan blackberry, and other non-native plants that are choking out the native vegetation. Sturdy work boots/shoes a must! The park is at 1600 10th Ave SE. Limited parking available. Meet inside the park by the large walnut tree. Volunteers are encouraged to bring a reusable water bottle. An adult must accompany youth under the age of 14 and all youth under 18 years of age must have an online waiver signed electronically by a parent/guardian. Sign up at http://volunteer.olympiawa.gov

Harvest Potluck: GRuB’s Victory Farm is hosting its inaugural Harvest Celebration & Potluck from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the farm, behind the Thurston County Food Bank’s up-and-coming Lacey Distribution Center at 7027 Martin Way E. GRuB will be grilling; bring your favorite sides and desserts or just your appetite. Vegan and vegetarian options available. There will be yard games and gardening technique demos. A work party will follow from 1-3 p.m. Information: Contact Beau@goodgrub.org, Jennah@goodgrub.org or Laura@goodgrub.org.

Sunday

Nisqually Land Trust Annual Meeting & Salmon Bake: The event will run 4 to 7:30 p.m. and dinner will feature grilled Nisqually salmon, accompaniments, and dessert. There also will be a no-host bar and a raffle. Capacity is limited, so registration is required. Suggested donation: $10 per adult. Location will be provided upon registration at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/annual-meeting-salmon-bake-registration-69068859819

South South Walk to End Alzheimer’s: Registration for the walk begins at 9 a.m. at Heritage Park in Olympia, followed by an opening ceremony at 10 a.m. and the two-mile walk at 10:30 a.m. This is a family and pet friendly event, and the walk route is fully accessible. It is free to attend; however, participants who donate or raise $100 or more will receive a Walk to End Alzheimer’s T-shirt. Information: contact Roxy Robertson at rorobertson@alz.org or 206-363-5500. To register, visit alz.org/walk or call 800-272-3900.

Monday

New to Medicare Presentation: This gathering will run from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at Tumwater Timberland Library, 7023 New Market St SW. Free; no registration necessary. The Statewide Health Insurance Benefits Advisors program provides free, unbiased and confidential help with Medicare choices. For more information, call 360-586-6181 ext. 134. SHIBA staff and volunteers are trained by the Washington Office of the Insurance Commissioner.

Tuesday

Public Hearing on Thurston Conservation District’s Proposed Rates and Charges: The hearing will begin at 5:30 p.m. at the Thurston County Courthouse, Building 2, Room 280, to gather resident input a system of rates and charges on properties within the Thurston Conservation District for collection in 2020-2024. The public may provide comments in person during the hearing or submit them, in writing, to: Ramiro Chavez, Board of County Commissioners, 2000 Lakeridge Dr. SW, Olympia, WA 98502. Written comments must be received by 4 p.m. Sept. 24. For more information about the Conservation District, visit: https://www.thurstoncd.com/. For more information on rates and charges, visit: https://www.thurstoncd.com/rates-and-charges/. The draft ordinance is at: https://www.thurstoncountywa.gov/tchome/tchomedocuments/TCD2019ProposedRatesAndCharges_DraftOrdinance.pdf

Sexual Health Education & Issues of Consent Roundtable #3: The state Legislature is considering legislation that calls for mandatory sexual health education that is accurate, age-appropriate, and inclusive. Planned Parenthood Votes Northwest and Hawaii is hosting a presentation and discussion regarding issues disabled children face in school regarding sexual health, consent, and sexual assault. Disability Rights Washington, a Seattle nonprofit, will speak on the issues at a roundtable from 7-8 p.m. at Octapas Cafe, 414 Fourth Ave. E, Olympia. Information: Angela.Holton@ppvnh.org.

Writing as Healing Class: This class that runs through November kicks off from 2-3:30 p.m. at the Olympia Senior Center, 222 Columbia St. NW. The instructor is Naomi Lombardi, who has a background in clinical psychology and writing. Register through Life Long Learning at 360-586-6181. Information: call 360-701-9637. All ages welcome.

History talk on Naches Pass: The Lacey Museum will host author and historian Dennis Larsen’s talk starting at 5:30 p.m. in the Lacey City Hall Council Chambers, 420 College St SE. He will tell the story of the 1853-1854 Naches Pass, the first wagon road in Washington Territory. Free. Information: LaceyMuseum.org.

Wednesday

Olympia City Hall Art Talk: Join Olympia artists Tom Boucher, Hart James and Tim Ransom for a brown-bag lunch from noon to 1 p.m. to discuss their work. This is the final day of their five-month exhibition at City Hall. The gathering will be in Room 207 of City Hall, 601 Fourth Ave. E.

Living Well Living Long conference: The Senior Action Network will host its eighth annual conference from 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 1925 Boulevard Road SE, Olympia. Admission is free, and breakfast and lunch are provided, but pre-registration is strongly encouraged because seating is limited. Visit either the Olympia or Lacey Senior Centers for a registration form, call Senior Services at 360-586-6181, or download a registration form at www.senioraction.net.

Yashiro Japanese Garden Volunteer Work Party: From 9:30 a.m. to noon, volunteers, staff and stewards will rake leaves and tackle the bothersome horsetail growing throughout the park at 1010 Plum St. SE. Meet at the side entrance to the park. Parking is available at the Lee Creighton Justice Center, 900 Plum St. SE. Dress for the weather and wear sturdy shoes or boots that can get wet and muddy. Volunteers are encouraged to bring a reusable water bottle. An adult must accompany youth under the age of 14 and all youth under 18 years of age must have an online waiver signed electronically by a parent/guardian. Visit http://volunteer.olympiawa.govto sign up.

Thursday

The State of Real Estate forum: The 11th annual Thurston Economic Development Council Real Estate Forum will be from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hotel RL Olympia, 2300 Evergreen Park Drive SW. Industry experts will address the current status of development in Thurston County and the South Sound region, including data, trends and projections related to commercial real estate and development in the South Sound. Experts will address what makes Thurston County one of the fastest-growing regions in the United States. Tickets are $55 and are available at https://www.thurstonedc.com/2019-real-estate-forum/

History Talks at Schmidt House: The Schmidt House kicks off the new season of noon-hour history talks with “On the Trail of a Legend: The Ox Rope Story, Fact or Fable?” by Ray Egan. For generations Washingtonians have been taught that the first wagon train to cross the Naches Pass lacked a rope long enough to let their wagons down a precipice. The tale says that three oxen were slain and their hides made into a makeshift rope. Egan examines whether it’s true. Doors open at 11:30 a.m. and close at capacity. Admission is free, but donations are appreciated. The Schmidt House is at 330 Schmidt Place SW, Tumwater. Information: Contact Don Trosper at 360-786-8117 or history@olytumfoundation.org.

Want to submit a community event for inclusion in What’s Happening? Send it 10 days or more in advance, written in the format you see above, to news@theolympian.com. Pictures are appreciated.

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