Washington state

Home sweet home? Study shows most Washington residents came from somewhere else

How America has changed: 225 years of statistics

In 1840, males outnumbered females 8.68 million to 8.38 million in the United States. By 1950, there were more females than males for the first time in U.S. history, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. See other statistics showing how America has
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In 1840, males outnumbered females 8.68 million to 8.38 million in the United States. By 1950, there were more females than males for the first time in U.S. history, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. See other statistics showing how America has

If you live in Washington, odds are you weren’t born here.

Washington is among the Western states that draw a majority of their residents from other parts of America, according to a recent Governing magazine study of U.S. Census data.

According to 2018 Census data, 7.5 million people live in Washington.

A majority of counties in the Evergreen State have more adult residents who were born out of the state than were born in it.

That includes Pierce County, where 39.9 percent of residents were born in the state; Thurston County, where 37.6 percent of residents are native Washingtonians; Whatcom County, where it’s 40.5 percent; Benton at 39.4 percent and Franklin at 34.5 percent.

In King County, the most densely populated county, just 29.1 percent of adult residents are native to the state.

At 59 percent, Lincoln County had the highest percentage of native residents.

Washington has observed steady growth in recent years, with 117,300 people moving to the state in 2017, according to the Washington Office of Financial Management, though that growth has tapered off some.

Most of that growth occurred in the five most populous counties: King, Pierce, Snohomish, Spokane and Clark counties.

The full report is online at www.governing.com.

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