Letters to the Editor

Letters to the editor for April 21

Geoducks meet Tinseltown as film crew visits local Chelsea Farms

The Olympia-based Chelsea Farms went Hollywood this summer as the television show “State Plate” filmed both their farm operations and the downtown Olympia oyster bar during a one-day visit in July. Hosted by former "American Idol" winner Taylor Hi
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The Olympia-based Chelsea Farms went Hollywood this summer as the television show “State Plate” filmed both their farm operations and the downtown Olympia oyster bar during a one-day visit in July. Hosted by former "American Idol" winner Taylor Hi

A clammy calamity

Fellow citizens,

The legislature is intending to enact, without a vote of the people, a law designating the razor clam as our official state clam. While digging for razor clams is a delightful hobby in Western Washington (and Oregon, and California), true Washingtonians know that our state is already better represented by another bivalve more endemic and rotund -- the geoduck. In fact, a survey conducted by our public radio station, KUOW, showed that over 70 percent of respondents preferred the geoduck as our state’s official clam.

In spite of this overwhelming public opinion, the state House unanimously passed House Bill 1061, sending it to the Senate for confirmation.

Now is the time to act. Fellow 12th Men, hipsters of the north, Puget Sound techies, farmers of the far east, random rain-soaked hikers scattered across our plethora of trails, and everyone in between, join me in calling for the Senate and Gov. Jay Inslee to reject House Bill 1061. Take to your phones and call your senators today, write your local newspapers, search for online petitions, tweet (if that’s what you do), and share the message online. Let us plant a seed of hope that will sprout into a garden of activism that even Ciscoe Morris would be proud of.

In a matter as sacred and permanent as our state clam, the people’s voice should not be ignored.

Shawn Cooper, Lake Stevens

Measles before the vaccine

I was almost 6 years old and early in the first grade when I came down with measles. Mom, as usual when she had a sick child, put me in her and Dad’s bed on the ground floor where she could watch me better than upstairs in my room.

I developed a high fever. Then I began to see things crawling on the ceiling. Big things. I was terrified. I screamed for Mom. She told me to keep my eyes closed and they would go away. I couldn’t do that. I had to keep track of where the snakes and dragons and assorted other things were going, as they were a mass of constant motion. I had to be sure they weren’t coming down the walls. I began to cry. It was awful.

This went on for a day and a night and most of the next day, as Mom tried to bring down my fever with aspirin. Let me tell you, it was a very long day and night and next day! For Mom as well as for me.

The second day I finally dropped off to sleep from exhaustion, and when I woke up I was better and the hallucinations were gone. But I can never forget that terror. A prick in the arm with some vaccine would have been a whole lot easier, but no vaccine existed in the mid-1930s.

Encephalopathy with measles is rare but can still happen. Just a warning.

Ruth W. Shearer, Lacey
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