Letters to the Editor

Letters to the editor for July 28

‘My mother died of Alzheimer’s – we need affordable and effective treatment’

Suzanne Wronsky's mother lost many years of her life to Alzheimer's disease. In the search for treatments for Alzheimer's, Wronsky makes the case that not only innovation but affordability are needed.
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Suzanne Wronsky's mother lost many years of her life to Alzheimer's disease. In the search for treatments for Alzheimer's, Wronsky makes the case that not only innovation but affordability are needed.

Vote for Phyllis Booth

Phyllis Booth is an energetic person who cares about the environment, people, and the political process. She has worked tirelessly as a volunteer for over 30 years. She volunteers as a nurse for the Olympia Free Clinic and worked on the Quixote Village. She is working against House Bill 1923, worked against the Missing Middle upzone as it violates the democratically developed Comprehensive Plan, and is involved in many other volunteer activities.

Phyllis wants to show citizens how to be heard by the city and show people the power that already belongs to them. She wants to help people reverse climate change, protect downtown from sea level rise and make smart choices about development.

She wants the city to be more transparent in doing business and will bring a fresh voice by challenging the “business-as-usual” approach so that she can actually solve problems.

She wants to bring the homeless people to the table to discuss solutions, form citizen groups to advocate for the vulnerable, and have two-way conversations with the city to generate solutions. She won’t take over $500 from any one donor so as not be indebted to special interests.

Phyllis has done so much for the community that I can’t list it all here. She has been extremely effective in her efforts to get things done. She has a strong backbone and will face challenges. But she is also capable of bringing people together to achieve solutions. I am voting for Phyllis and I encourage you to do so.

Beverly Torguson, Olympia

Support all families struggling with dementia

Alzheimer’s disease doesn’t strike just the elderly. The 200,000 Americans diagnosed with dementia before age 65 need services like in-home care, transportation, and caregiver support.

Alzheimer’s Association advocates have asked members of Congress to cosponsor the Younger Onset Alzheimer’s Disease Act, which would amend the Older Americans Act to serve these families too.

I am grateful that Congressman Derek Kilmer has cosponsored this bipartisan legislation, H.R. 1903. Please join me in urging Congressman Denny Heck to join him as a cosponsor of the bill.

This advocacy is important to me because I have worked with families who are navigating the world of dementia for over 15 years and am astounded at the increase in family members who are seeking my services regarding early-onset dementia. I know the heavy burden that these families carry, and they need support.

All our members of Congress should continue to actively support policies that address Alzheimer’s disease as the national public health crisis it is.

Laura Vaillancourt, Olympia
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