Olympia police officers Javier Sola Del Vigo (left) and Paul Frailey are thanked by Nick Miranda and Molly Mckenzie (right) during their nightly walking patrol of downtown Olympia in 2015. A property tax proposal on Olympia’s November ballot would bring the department’s walking patrol back up to pre-recession staffing levels, as well as fund neighborhood liaison officers, pay for the Community Court program, and fund crisis services.
Olympia police officers Javier Sola Del Vigo (left) and Paul Frailey are thanked by Nick Miranda and Molly Mckenzie (right) during their nightly walking patrol of downtown Olympia in 2015. A property tax proposal on Olympia’s November ballot would bring the department’s walking patrol back up to pre-recession staffing levels, as well as fund neighborhood liaison officers, pay for the Community Court program, and fund crisis services. Tony Overman Olympian file photo
Olympia police officers Javier Sola Del Vigo (left) and Paul Frailey are thanked by Nick Miranda and Molly Mckenzie (right) during their nightly walking patrol of downtown Olympia in 2015. A property tax proposal on Olympia’s November ballot would bring the department’s walking patrol back up to pre-recession staffing levels, as well as fund neighborhood liaison officers, pay for the Community Court program, and fund crisis services. Tony Overman Olympian file photo

Does Olympia need a tax hike to support public safety? Or can money be found elsewhere?

October 01, 2017 05:00 AM

UPDATED October 02, 2017 07:54 PM

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