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Woman arrested for vehicular assault allegedly told police she drank a half-bottle of rum

A 28-year-old woman was arrested on suspicion of vehicular assault Tuesday night after she crashed into a car at College Street Southeast and Lacey Boulevard Southeast, according to Lacey police.
A 28-year-old woman was arrested on suspicion of vehicular assault Tuesday night after she crashed into a car at College Street Southeast and Lacey Boulevard Southeast, according to Lacey police. Courtesy

A 28-year-old woman who was arrested Tuesday night on suspicion of vehicular assault while driving under the influence allegedly told police she had consumed a half-bottle of rum prior to a collision in Lacey, court documents show.

The crash occurred about 9 p.m. at Lacey Boulevard Southeast and College Street Southeast.

The woman taken into custody, Tiffany N. Faries, appeared in Thurston County Superior Court on Wednesday.

The court found probable cause for vehicular assault while driving under the influence and she was released on her own recognizance. However, she has to meet the following conditions: she can’t drive without a valid license, insurance and ignition interlock, and she’s not to possess or consume alcohol. Arraignment was set for June 4.

According to charging documents:

Faries was headed north on College Street in a Hyundai when she crashed into a Saturn on Lacey Boulevard. One witness told Lacey police that she was traveling at 70 miles per hour. Court documents do not spell out a specific speed, but do note a “high rate of speed.”

After the collision, both drivers emerged from their vehicles and “were laying on the sidewalk.” Both were later taken to Providence St. Peter Hospital in Olympia.

Faries suffered minor injuries, but court records indicate the driver of the Saturn suffered a fractured wrist, a concussion, a laceration that required sutures, a contusion on the adrenal gland above the kidney and multiple abrasions.

Medical staff determined that Faries’ blood alcohol content was 0.37, more than four times higher than the Washington state legal limit of 0.08.

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